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Electronics Coursework

The coursework demands that you build and test a real electronic artefact.  It must:

  • Consist of at least three active devices (e.g. transistors, logic gates, op-amps).
  • Be the result of research into at least two circuits that do the same job.  You must give reasons for the choice you have made.
  • Be built using sub-systems as in the systems approach;
  • Be tested at the subsystem level as well as the whole circuit.
  • Show evidence that you have done everything that you claim to have done. 
  • Include circuit diagrams and pictures, as well as a written report.

What you must NOT do:

  • Use voltages higher than 50 V or powers of more than 100 W;
  • Do radio circuits unless you have permission from the relevant radio authorities.
  • Build a virtual circuit on a computer; this will get virtual marks (i.e. zero).  This does not stop you doing your design work on a computer.
  • Produce a circuit that is designed to cause distress to other people, e.g. “taiser” (One of my students wanted to do this and was most put out when I emphatically forbade him to do so).
  • Build a circuit from a kit.

 

Your teacher will brief you in more detail about the project requirements.  Here are some points to think about:

  • Keep it simple, especially if you are a novice. You will get more marks if it’s a simple circuit that works well than if it’s a complex circuit that fails.
  • Use the Internet, magazines, or books.  You must quote all sources you have used.  You do NOT have to design the circuit from scratch.
  • Break down the circuit diagram into the sub-systems and re-draw the circuit diagram as sub-systems.

 

The coursework demands that you build and test a real electronic artefact.  It must:

  • Consist of at least three active devices (e.g. transistors, logic gates, op-amps).
  • Be the result of research into at least two circuits that do the same job.  You must give reasons for the choice you have made.
  • Be built using sub-systems as in the systems approach;
  • Be tested at the subsystem level as well as the whole circuit.
  • Show evidence that you have done everything that you claim to have done. 
  • Include circuit diagrams and pictures, as well as a written report.

What you must NOT do:

  • Use voltages higher than 50 V or powers of more than 100 W;
  • Do radio circuits unless you have permission from the relevant radio authorities.
  • Build a virtual circuit on a computer; this will get virtual marks (i.e. zero).  This does not stop you doing your design work on a computer.
  • Produce a circuit that is designed to cause distress to other people, e.g. “taiser” (One of my students wanted to do this and was most put out when I emphatically forbade him to do so).
  • Build a circuit from a kit.

 

Your teacher will brief you in more detail about the project requirements.  Here are some points to think about:

  • Keep it simple, especially if you are a novice. You will get more marks if it’s a simple circuit that works well than if it’s a complex circuit that fails.
  • Use the Internet, magazines, or books.  You must quote all sources you have used.  You do NOT have to design the circuit from scratch.
  • Break down the circuit diagram into the sub-systems and re-draw the circuit diagram as sub-systems.

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