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British Library Web Archive Confusion?

The BBC news announced today that The British Library wants to archive every British website, for posterity.  This GREAT IDEA has been dedicated quite a bit of air time on TV and radio – as well as coverage on the BBC website.

The coverage is all about how important it is not to lose these websites, as they are a part of the Internet’s heritage.  They say that we don’t want to lose these sites for ever – Good point.

But – The service already exists!

There’s already internationally respected archives, like The Internet Archive, which have done exactly this, for years!  Right now, you can pull up an old copy of almost any website or copies of deleted websites, simply by entering their URL into The Way Back Machine.

I thought to begin with, that no one at the BBC or The British Library had heard of the other archive providers, but I was wrong.  A long article on the BBC website, which restates the need for this service, ends with the following:

Other informal projects – such as the WayBack Machine – also exist.

Of course, that statement pretty much renders the entire article as pointless and shows why there’s no real need for the service. I LOVE the British Library and what they do, but cannot see why they are selling this idea as something new.

20 popular and easy to guess passwords!

If you want to protect your online accounts from hackers, rule number one is to select strong, hard to guess passwords.

However, a recent report by the guys at Internet security firm Impervia, suggests that Internet users are still relying on the same kind of predictable passwords that they used a decade ago.

Password strength

Impervia released a list of the top 20 passwords, which were found when RockYou.com was hacked last month.  According to Impervia, these were strikingly similar to the passwords used on Hotmail.com, when that too was breached almost 20 years ago!

Starting with the most commonly used, the 20 most popular passwords were:

123456

12345

123456789

Password

iloveyou

princess

rockyou

1234567

12345678

abc123

Nicole

Daniel

babygirl

monkey

Jessica

Lovely

michael

Ashley

654321

Qwerty

It’s clear for all to see that many people are still using predictable strings of letters and numbers and names as their passwords.  Obviously, if you are using ANY of these, it’s a good idea to change it for something stronger; to avoid the risk of a brute force attack.

Password tips

A pdf on the Impervia website gives some more detail AND some good advice on how to build strong, memorable, passwords. If you are looking forward to translate this content, contact Translation Agencies UK

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